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New Us-6 Signage


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#1 RoadDog

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 04:34 PM

In a Daily News article by John Skeer from Dec. 14th, the California cities of Palmdale and Lancaster are putting up signs to mark US-6.

US-6 is called the nation's longest continuous highway, running from Provincetown, Massachusetts, to Long Beach, California.

Fred Hahn, past two term mayor of the City of Lancaster is trying to build up interest in Route 6 comparable to Route 66. He became interested six years ago after vacationing on America's historical roads. He kept coming across Route 6. He became involved with the US-6 Tourist Association and now serves as its executive director for California.

US-6 has been called the Roosevelt Highway (after Pres. Theodore Roosevelt), Midland Trail Roadway, and its official title is The Grand Army of the Republic Highway. That was the name of the organization of Union veterans set up after the Civil War.

It originally started as a short route between Provincetown and Brewster, NY, but was extended.

#2 Mike Ballard

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Posted 24 February 2008 - 03:48 PM

QUOTE (RoadDog @ Dec 15 2006, 01:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
In a Daily News article by John Skeer from Dec. 14th, the California cities of Palmdale and Lancaster are putting up signs to mark US-6.

US-6 is called the nation's longest continuous highway, running from Provincetown, Massachusetts, to Long Beach, California.

Fred Hahn, past two term mayor of the City of Lancaster is trying to build up interest in Route 6 comparable to Route 66. He became interested six years ago after vacationing on America's historical roads. He kept coming across Route 6. He became involved with the US-6 Tourist Association and now serves as its executive director for California.

US-6 has been called the Roosevelt Highway (after Pres. Theodore Roosevelt), Midland Trail Roadway, and its official title is The Grand Army of the Republic Highway. That was the name of the organization of Union veterans set up after the Civil War.

It originally started as a short route between Provincetown and Brewster, NY, but was extended.


That signage also extends to Santa Clarita, still along Sierra Highway. There are about three signs, one near the north end of the city, one at Solemint Junction, the last at the south end of the city.

#3 Mike Ballard

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 08:57 PM

As an update to the signage in Santa Clarita...

 

For some reason, most, if not all, of the signs along Sierra Highway in Santa Clarita are gone. I don't know why they are gone now who really placed them in the first place. It is quite disappointing. I may have some photos of the signs, while they were still up. Not sure I have posted them on my US 6 tour though.



#4 32vld

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 08:48 PM

I been on route 6 far east as Danbury Ct and west as Wellsboro PA.

 

Some day I will make my first coast to coast trip. I live on LI, NY and have been on a lot of US 20 in NY west of Rochester, into some of it in Mass.

 

I remember being on US 20 when I was 16 in NY and found out that there were routes that used the same number across the country. Since 1970 I have wanted to take each coast to coast route starting with US 20.

 

I understand that roads change hands so state, feds, county, towns, pass off roads to each other for any reasons. Though maintenance responsibilities change there is no need to change the roads original route number. Even when an old alignment is totally bypassed and the new section gets the original route number there ought to be a law that the old road be indicated with the original number followed with the letter H indicating the original route.

 

A boon to tourism and a readily marked detour when a major accident causes the new alignment road to get blocked.



#5 knightfan26917

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 02:26 PM

I've been on US Route 6 in a few different states ... Illinois (it is ~1-2 hours south of me), Ohio, Pennsylvania & Utah ... maybe someday I'll be able to travel the entire length.  I'm always amused looking at a map of it ... because it has so many twists & turns & literally goes in all directions. ;)

 

US 20 goes right through my hometown ... & I've been on it in the middle of the country & on both coasts ... hoping to someday drive all of it, too.

 

 

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#6 roadtrip62

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 11:04 AM

I've managed to drive all of US-6 east from Joliet, IL, and all of old US-6 in California.  I've even driven some isolated locations between, including most of Colorado.  I knew I would never get to the whole route, so I created a "virtual" roadtrip, writing about what I might have seen in the year 1962.  I just completed it on my website and it took me 36 virtual days to drive the entire route: there's a lot to stop and see!


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