Jump to content


Photo

Waaam! Old Airplanes On Columbia River Highway


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,646 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 09 October 2010 - 03:01 PM

Last weekend Sheila and I met friends on the Columbia River at Hood River, one of our favorite Northwest communities. The Columbia River Highway was as spectacular as ever, and I as well as others (eg Denny) have described it here before. What was new (to me) was the very impressive WAAAM: Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum. HERE

One of our friends is a retired United Airlines pilot who is building his own plane, and he knows his aircraft. As we strolled through the two enormous hangers we enjoyed a running narrative on the history and development of the airplanes in the collection....a rare treat.

The planes were fantastic. We were told that each is in flying condition, and most get out occasionally. In addition to the airplanes, there were scores of vintage automobiles, many on loan from their owners. And beyond the autos, there were a few motorcycles, several vintage bicycles, and a large collection of military vehicles. They even had a play area for kids where they could "fly" airplanes.

My photos really don't do the collection justice. I will return one of these days and get some better shots, but for now I just want to make anyone traveling the historic Columbia River Highway, or I-84 in Oregon aware of this terrific museum. It is hard to believe anyone could be disappointed, if they have any interest at all in airplanes or cars. It was a terrific stop and our three hour visit was over before I realized the time had past. We were allowed to wander and look at our own pace, so long as we honored the familiar yellow rope.

The images below are in 3D, viewable cross eyed.


dave

Keep the Show on the Road!


Posted Image


Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image



Posted Image

1951 Hudson Hornet for Alex



Posted Image

Dashboard of 1951 Hudson Hornet



Posted Image

Old Time Air Conditioner!They just sprayed you in the face with mist!!


Posted Image

#2 mobilene

mobilene

    Road Scholar

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,223 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indianapolis

Posted 09 October 2010 - 06:25 PM

I dig the Hudson!

#3 DennyG

DennyG

    Road Scholar

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,648 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cincinnati, OH

Posted 09 October 2010 - 08:16 PM

Gorgeous. I don't really need another reason to return to the Columbia River but I'll drop those planes on the already overloaded side of the scale. By the way, did Stuart Little peddle off on that little bicycle parked in front of the others or was it just a tease?

#4 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:43 PM

Dave:

The "old time AC" pictured is really an auto version of that ubiquitous Arizona rooftop fixture, the swamp-box cooler. The "swamp-box" is an ingeniously simple device in which a rotating fan motor sucks warm air over water-laden pads (aspen chips make the best cooler pad material), cooling the air before it is drawn in through an opening in one side of the cooler and blown throughout the house via the ductwork.
A cooler is actually more efficient than an air conditioner (and a heck of a lot cheaper to run) during the first part of a southern Arizona summer, from early May through the end of June, when 100+ degree days with single-digit humidity (I've experienced 2%!) are the norm.
They definitely lose their edge over AC once the 'monsoon season' with higher humidity (20-40%) kicks in around the first of July through mid-September. Now that it is once again drier and not as hot, a cooler again works wonderfully from mid-September through October, as summer winds down.
The ideal set-up, of course, is to have both installed at one's home.
The 'car cooler' is even simpler, as the blower motor is not needed since the forward motion of the auto forces the air through the water-infused pad in the device. I do remember such devices as being fairly common out here (Tucson) even back in the '60s when auto AC was not nearly the standard equipment that is is today.
My family did not have them, but we did splurge on huge, dealer-installed under-dash AC units (remember those?) on two of the first three cars that I clearly remember: A 1960 Dodge Dart Pioneer and a 1961 Rambler American. The third vehicle from my dimly-remembered youth, a much-used 1952 Ford, had "roll down the windows and sweat" cooling only!
As far as the WAAAM is concerned, I am looking forward to visiting it next summer, when the World Airline Historical Society hold it's annual convention and trade show in Portland, adjacent to PDX. One of the "Rose City"s enticements is the fact that there are FIVE aviation museums within an hour or two drive of Portland. The best-known is probably the Evergreen Air Museum in nearby McMinnville, and the WAAAM is one of the others.
Could you (on anyone) ID the car that proudly wears the 'car cooler'. I should know it with that distinctive headlight treatment, but I just can't ID it!

#5 Alex Burr - hester_nec

Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Road Warrior

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 590 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis, TN
  • Interests:Hudson automobiles, "Blue" Hiways, reading and computers.

Posted 10 October 2010 - 07:16 AM

There is nothing, IMHO, better than the juxtaposition of a period car and airplane in the same space!!! Those old tail-draggers are another of my loves. Just wish that museum was a tad closer to Memphis.

Thanks for the Hudson photo. Isn't the amount of chrome on the dash board amazing!!!!

Hudsonly,
Alex Burr
Memphis, TN

#6 Alex Burr - hester_nec

Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Road Warrior

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 590 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis, TN
  • Interests:Hudson automobiles, "Blue" Hiways, reading and computers.

Posted 10 October 2010 - 12:51 PM

Dave:

Could you (on anyone) ID the car that proudly wears the 'car cooler'. I should know it with that distinctive headlight treatment, but I just can't ID it!


Could be a late 30's Pontiac, going by what looks like a Pony emblem under the headlight. That's a WAG, by the way.

Hudsonly,
Alex Burr
Memphis, TN

Edited by Alex Burr - hester_nec, 10 October 2010 - 12:58 PM.


#7 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 10 October 2010 - 01:03 PM

Could be a late 30's Pontiac, going by what looks like a Pony emblem under the headlight. That's a WAG, by the way.

Hudsonly,
Alex Burr
Memphis, TN


Thanks for the guess, but my old auto source ("Encyclopedia of American Cars 1930-1980") shows all Pontiac model years as having 'normal' round headlights, both before and after they migrated from the sides of the grille into the fenders. The '39 Nashes had a somewhat similar odd headlight shape, but not quite the same. Also a different grille pattern. Any other guesses?

#8 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,646 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 10 October 2010 - 01:08 PM

Dave:

The "old time AC" pictured is really an auto version of that ubiquitous Arizona rooftop fixture, the swamp-box cooler. The "swamp-box" is an ingeniously simple device in which a rotating fan motor sucks warm air over water-laden pads (aspen chips make the best cooler pad material), cooling the air before it is drawn in through an opening in one side of the cooler and blown throughout the house via the ductwork.
A cooler is actually more efficient than an air conditioner (and a heck of a lot cheaper to run) during the first part of a southern Arizona summer, from early May through the end of June, when 100+ degree days with single-digit humidity (I've experienced 2%!) are the norm.
They definitely lose their edge over AC once the 'monsoon season' with higher humidity (20-40%) kicks in around the first of July through mid-September. Now that it is once again drier and not as hot, a cooler again works wonderfully from mid-September through October, as summer winds down.
The ideal set-up, of course, is to have both installed at one's home.
The 'car cooler' is even simpler, as the blower motor is not needed since the forward motion of the auto forces the air through the water-infused pad in the device. I do remember such devices as being fairly common out here (Tucson) even back in the '60s when auto AC was not nearly the standard equipment that is is today.
My family did not have them, but we did splurge on huge, dealer-installed under-dash AC units (remember those?) on two of the first three cars that I clearly remember: A 1960 Dodge Dart Pioneer and a 1961 Rambler American. The third vehicle from my dimly-remembered youth, a much-used 1952 Ford, had "roll down the windows and sweat" cooling only!
As far as the WAAAM is concerned, I am looking forward to visiting it next summer, when the World Airline Historical Society hold it's annual convention and trade show in Portland, adjacent to PDX. One of the "Rose City"s enticements is the fact that there are FIVE aviation museums within an hour or two drive of Portland. The best-known is probably the Evergreen Air Museum in nearby McMinnville, and the WAAAM is one of the others.
Could you (on anyone) ID the car that proudly wears the 'car cooler'. I should know it with that distinctive headlight treatment, but I just can't ID it!



It is a 1938 Studebaker State Commander.

I recall the Tucson weather, and Yes, I definitely recall under dash knee knocker after market air conditioners. And I also recall riding as a kid with my parents on a trip between LA and the Grand Canyon about 1950 with one of those swamp coolers hanging on the window. I agree that swamp coolers work at home, but at 60 MPH, they just produced a mist. It was a tough choice whether to turn the wind wing into your face along with dust and bugs, or take a shower with the cooler.

The WAAAM facility took me by surprise. I knew it was there because we had passed it before, but I had no idea of the quality and range of the collection. Much of the display evokes a feeling of the 1930's when automobiles and airplanes were siblings, and were often featured side by side and described in the same breath. It is a must see, and I know you will enjoy it.

Dave

Keep the Show on the Road!

#9 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,646 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 10 October 2010 - 01:14 PM

There is nothing, IMHO, better than the juxtaposition of a period car and airplane in the same space!!! Those old tail-draggers are another of my loves. Just wish that museum was a tad closer to Memphis.

Thanks for the Hudson photo. Isn't the amount of chrome on the dash board amazing!!!!

Hudsonly,
Alex Burr
Memphis, TN


Alex,

Yah, the dashboard chrome is great and note the starburst on the shift lever. Keen! :)

I am pondering doing more dashboards. Some are downright spectacular; I would go so far as to say, maybe more interesting than the car itself.


Dave

Keep the Show on the Road!

#10 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 10 October 2010 - 01:21 PM

It is a 1938 Studebaker State Commander.


Ah, a Studie!
When looking through my reference book, I missed it mainly 'cause I wasn't looking much before 1940. Should've known that Studie was a style leader in moving the headlights into the fenders just as they were the first to bring out an all-new postwar car that made the 'big three's' 1946-47 offerings look positively ancient!
Thanks!

#11 Alex Burr - hester_nec

Alex Burr - hester_nec

    Road Warrior

  • Full Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 590 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Memphis, TN
  • Interests:Hudson automobiles, "Blue" Hiways, reading and computers.

Posted 10 October 2010 - 04:42 PM

Thanks for the guess, but my old auto source ("Encyclopedia of American Cars 1930-1980") shows all Pontiac model years as having 'normal' round headlights, both before and after they migrated from the sides of the grille into the fenders. The '39 Nashes had a somewhat similar odd headlight shape, but not quite the same. Also a different grille pattern. Any other guesses?


My 2nd guess would be late 30's LaSalle, but that's probably wrong too. :blink: I can tell you for sure that it ain't a Hudson - or Hudson relative.

Just looking thru some pics - 1937-1938 era Lincoln has similar style headlights. Hmmmmmmmm

Hudsonly,
Alex Burr
Memphis, TN

Edited by Alex Burr - hester_nec, 10 October 2010 - 04:50 PM.


#12 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,646 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 10 October 2010 - 06:31 PM

Gorgeous. I don't really need another reason to return to the Columbia River but I'll drop those planes on the already overloaded side of the scale. By the way, did Stuart Little peddle off on that little bicycle parked in front of the others or was it just a tease?


Denny,

You betchum! And if you look carefully at the third photo you will see the plane he flew in. :lol:

Dave

Keep the Show on the Road!

#13 knightfan26917

knightfan26917

    Roadie

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 384 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Elgin IL

Posted 14 October 2010 - 10:47 PM

Great pics, Dave!

My 2 favorites:
3rd from the top
(and)
1951 Hudson Hornet



Cort | 37.m.IL.pigValve.pacemaker | 5 Monte Carlos + 1 Caprice Classic |* Rt 66+northwestUS, 2011?
MCs.CC + CHD.models.HO.legos.RadioShows + RoadTrips.us66 = http://www.chevyasylum.com/cort
"Uh, what model is it?" ... Johnny Cash ... 'One Piece At A Time'

#14 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 02 September 2011 - 02:58 AM

Just got back from the Portland area. Drove out the Columbia River Highway to the WAAAM. What a great ride! Simply beautiful. The WAAAM was an excellent museum as well. Did four other aviation museums in the area--Evergreen (McMinville), Tillamook, Hillsboro, and Pearson (at Fort Vancouver), but I think I liked the WAAAM best of all, even though it is far smaller than either Evergreen or the Tillamook blimp hangar museum. As others have opined, the juxtaposition of period cars, planes, and other motorized vehicles is something one does not see often. Kudos to Oregon for keeping as much of the old highway drivable as they have. The 1918 'view tower' is awesome!

#15 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,646 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 02 September 2011 - 12:38 PM

Just got back from the Portland area. Drove out the Columbia River Highway to the WAAAM. What a great ride! Simply beautiful. The WAAAM was an excellent museum as well. Did four other aviation museums in the area--Evergreen (McMinville), Tillamook, Hillsboro, and Pearson (at Fort Vancouver), but I think I liked the WAAAM best of all, even though it is far smaller than either Evergreen or the Tillamook blimp hangar museum. As others have opined, the juxtaposition of period cars, planes, and other motorized vehicles is something one does not see often. Kudos to Oregon for keeping as much of the old highway drivable as they have. The 1918 'view tower' is awesome!


First, I'm glad that what you saw in the Northwest, you enjoyed. The old Columbia River Highway is a premier drive, and few if any other roads offer the spectacular scenery it does. I hope it wasn't too busy.

I'd appreciate your thoughts on the Evergreen and Tillamook museums. We get down the Oregon Coast occasionally and I often think of stopping on the way. It has been at least ten years since I was in the Tillamook facility, and I have never been to the Evergreen, but I want to at least see the Spruce Goose.

Dave

Keep the Show on the Road!

#16 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 02 September 2011 - 01:56 PM

First, I'm glad that what you saw in the Northwest, you enjoyed. The old Columbia River Highway is a premier drive, and few if any other roads offer the spectacular scenery it does. I hope it wasn't too busy.

I'd appreciate your thoughts on the Evergreen and Tillamook museums. We get down the Oregon Coast occasionally and I often think of stopping on the way. It has been at least ten years since I was in the Tillamook facility, and I have never been to the Evergreen, but I want to at least see the Spruce Goose.

Dave

Keep the Show on the Road!


Each is quite different, and enjoyable in their own way. The Evergreen museum is new, state-of-the-art, and huge. Where else can you find a museum/water park combo? Not to mention a 747 water slide!
On the museum side there are two large hangars, an IMAX theater between them, and scattered aircraft displayed outdoors. It even dwarfs my local Pima Air and Space Museum, which is one of the larger ones in the country.
One note, though: To go up onto the flight deck of the Goose is an extra charge. And they don't have the mannequin of Howard at the controls, like they did in Long Beach, which is where I first saw the plane back in '85.

The Tillamook museum has a totally different charm. Much more of a rustic, 'let's make a museum' kind of charm. Even though they have a large collection of aircraft, the immense size of that WWII blimp hangar makes it look small!
It reminds me of the Airline History Museum at the old TWA hangars at the old downtown Kansas City airport in a way, with the 'do it yourself' type of feel.
Both are well worth a visit.
An unexpected gem of this trip was the small, open by appointment, Classic Aviation Museum at the Hillsboro airport. This one is really kind of a 'rich man's hobby' type of place, as most of the planes in it are owned by one person who allows them to be visited. He has some rare metal, like a 19850's French jet trainer called the Fouga Magister, and several MiGs and F-104 Starfighters.
This is really a 'hands-on' museum, as one can touch and poke around the aircraft, all of which are either flyable or in the process of being restored to flying condition. My hands smelled like Skydrol (hydraulic fluid) when I left.
The fifth area museum was the Pearson Air Museum, on the grounds of Pearson Field at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in Vancouver WA. A friend flew his Beech Sundowner out to Pearson from Indiana for this event we attended in Portland (Airliners International), and the only flying Boeing 40, a 1928 mail/four passenger aircraft, was there for the event as well, and offering rides. Pearson is one of the oldest operatiog airfields in the US, dating back to WWI era, and was Portland's first airport. The old Army Air Corps hangar is now the museum, and it too has interesting displays and aircraft.
Proibably more detail than you asked for, but hope this is interesting to you. And the WAAAM was terrific, to get this back to roads and cars as well as airplanes!

#17 mga707

mga707

    Weekend Traveler

  • Full Members
  • Pip
  • 247 posts

Posted 03 October 2011 - 10:37 PM

The WAAAM is the featured museum in the "Museum Pass" section of the latest issue of "Collectible Automobile" magazine (December 2011). Very complimentary article and lots of pictures.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users