Jump to content


Photo

Rv'ing On The American Road


  • Please log in to reply
52 replies to this topic

#21 darthfadar

darthfadar

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 26 posts

Posted 22 August 2007 - 10:51 AM

QUOTE (brownwho63 @ Aug 22 2007, 07:06 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Mary Sue and I talked about buying a "retirement RV" for years. This decision did and still does not make her happy, especially since her sister and brother-in-law cruise coast-to-coast in a huge, luxury-type stagecoach that would make Dolly Parton envious.

My reasons for opting out of the RV life include:

(a) I love to drive the Montes or Vette on blue highways because I'm a car guy. How much fun can it be to cruise a big ugly box that costs mucho bucks?
(cool.gif Lousy gas mileage.
ゥ Maintenance and insurance costs.
(d) Personal property tax. Missouri is notorious for gouging everyone annually for any type of vehicle.
(e) Parking. Our burg does not allow an RV to be parked anywhere in the subdivision.
(f) Frequent emptying of waste water and all that entails.
(g) Frequent setting up and hooking up; then reversing the process a short time later.

Sooooo.....we cruise in one of the Chevys and lodge in a motel. If we haven't stayed in a particular motel in the past, we inspect the room first. Sometimes we "camp out" This works for us (well, especially me)....Bliss


I agree, its all about perspective. I think even 6 years ago, I wouldn't not have considered a motorhome. But, I'll try to rebuttal your 7 points above..

a- Our 10 year old MH cost us $50,000. What is the value of your vette? The previous owner kept the MH garage kept & it looks pretty darn good! Like a classic car, it can be painted & the interior remodeled. Even on my blue color income, I can budget that. The MH is fun to drive & 'ugly' is in the eye of the beholder. (Some year vettes are better looking to me than others). It does require careful driving & the slower the speed the better,but isn't that how a blue highway should be driven?

b- Yes, my mileage of our 36' MH, at best, is 9.5 MPG pulling a Honda CRV. However, I am not paying nightly fees to stay in a room I may need to inspect. Also, if we choose we eat in or out. If we choose to eat in, most of the time the food has been prepared at home, vacuum sealed & frozen. We simply microwave the item when we're ready to dine. Not every night is geared to pulling out the BBQ or using the convection/microwave oven. So, I'd say on a normal days travel, our budgets are even or better than yours.

c- I'm actually surprised at the cost of my insurance is. Consider a new SUV is $40,000. (I have no idea what a new vette costs).

Maintenance on a MH is like maintenance on a house or a car. I do a lot of the work myself. I feel each repair saves me $200. MY MH has not been prone to many costly repairs if I was to have sent it to a mechanic.

d- Our MH has some tax write off advantages. Even in California our one time tax was $900 & our yearly registration is $300. Again, comparable to buying, let's say an Tahoe or Escalade.

e- We do have the privilege of parking our MH on our property. Our daughter & son-in-law do not in Portland. Their monthly cost to park their MH on a private lot is $40.

Also, while traveling Walmarts, Cracker barrel restaurants & other businesses will let you park & sleep overnight, no charge. However, we do make a point of spending some of our $ there.

f- Emptying the tanks is not a big challenge. It doesn't sound like a pretty job, either. My wife & I can go 5 days (& a day or 2 more) before emptying the grey & black tanks & refilling the fresh water. We usually just stay at an RV park & do this. However, there are truck stops with sites for dumping & filling for fresh waster.

g- Most RVs have battery, inverter & generator power. There is simply no need to hook up & disconnect for short periods of time.

Again, a motel can inspect great until you get an unruly visitor next to your room or above or below you.

There was one time when I had a noisy neighbor at a park. I went outside & asked if I could help with anything. The reply was a cordial 'no' & the noise stopped.

Again, I'm not trying to convince or convert anyone on RVing. It is a personal choice


However, you may want to see this attachment. There is some money involved here. (Not mine)

Attached Files



#22 mobilene

mobilene

    Road Scholar

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indianapolis

Posted 22 August 2007 - 11:51 AM

QUOTE (Kevin @ Aug 22 2007, 11:51 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The MH <...> does require careful driving & the slower the speed the better,but isn't that how a blue highway should be driven?


Just as long as I'm not right behind you in my little car!!! :-) Especially on a winding road, I like to open up the throttle a bit, see how my suspension holds the roads through the curves. I've been behind too many RVs for miles, wanting to curse the driver's name if I only knew it.

Driving something as large as a school bus frightens the bejabbers out of me. I don't even really like driving a full-sized van, although I can do so competently thanks to a summer driving them for a courier service back in college. Give me a little car any day.

jim

#23 roadmaven

roadmaven

    Roadie

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 475 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Hoosier State
  • Interests:2-lane highways, vintage campers, Corvairs, camping, greasy diners

Posted 22 August 2007 - 06:12 PM

Well, I've got something for you that we plan on having *hopefully* within the next 10 years....and you can tow it with a Vette or Monte Carlo.....or even a Corvair! So, you can still drive your classics AND sleep in it!

"It" is here!

Now wouldn't that just be perfect at the campgrounds at Meremec Caverns?

#24 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 22 August 2007 - 07:13 PM

I love reading this thread! Everybody is right...for their lifestyle. I can see each image, and could see myself doing it...some of the time.

And you could use this thread as the best summation of different perspectives I have ever seen on the subject.

I see Kevin and Jack cruising in luxury and comfort, stopping in a nice place, unhooking the car and exploring the area. I知 thinking that works best either where you stay a few nights in one place, or you have a destination and you stay there ...like the Reno thing. Or you own a lot in a development devoted to RV痴...I see that in the eastern part of our state. It is a fun place to gather and reacquaint yourself with RV pals. I don稚 see Kevin or Jack taking a dirt road en route on the spur of the moment. I can see myself and Sheila in all those situations....some of the time.

Then you have me with my self contained Okanogan. Drive it anywhere you can a car, get 10mpg, but leave one member of the family home. Not enough space. I can do that, I have done that, and I like it, sometimes. But I love my wife and she is my travel and playmate...so that only works some of the time.

And then there is the motel, which we now do a lot. In the past year I have stayed in maybe 50. I liked two enough to want to go back. But all but two were acceptable. And the issue of meeting other travelers at a motel is a prime disappointment. What has happened to us in the past 40 years? Moteling is almost the opposite of RV段ng in that respect. But why? You would think the breakfast area would be abuzz with people comparing travel notes and experiences. Instead it is usually like the waiting room at the IRS.

I agree that tenting is pretty rugged for the chorological high achievers. My wife and I tried it about five years ago by borrowing the kids gear. When some jerk pulled into the campground at 2AM, started a camp fire, and sat around talking and drinking, my fantasies about camping were over.

So like Kevin says, It痴 all perspective.

We are thinking about a 3 months USA tour. Motels, or RV. When I computed the cost by RV and Motel I was amazed at how close the costs came.

You pros...check my numbers, and correct me.

Either we get a house sitter and leave Bo home, or take him with us. We will not stay another night in a motel doggy room. They may add a $25 cleaning fee to your room bill, but it doesn稚 go for cleaning.

So, lets assume that we RV it. I don稚 want an RV for life. I would sell it when we get back. So lets assume I buy one with 25,000 miles on it and put another 12,000 on it in 3 months. Suppose I pay $35,000 for it. That means I will pay $3000 in tax and I will assume $5000 in depreciation and repairs. So I am out $8000 for the vehicle. At 5mpg, gas at $2.75 is going to cost $6600. Overnights at $20 each for 90 days is $1800. Aside from food, that is $12,800

Now lets use the family car and leave bo with the house sitter instead. Let痴 put the motel with tax at $100 a night or $9000 and gasoline is $1100 at my 30mpg. Depreciation on my car will be $1000. So that is $11,100.

I think eating in or out is a wash. Obviously eating in the RV is less expensive, but then there is the cooking and clean up, etc. And if you really want cheap, use the fringe and microwave in the motel room. If you want to add $20 a day to the food budget for eating out over eating in, the comparison is still a wash.

And that surprised me, a lot. Because every other time I have done the numbers, it was cheaper by motel.

But I contend that the issue isn稚 cost anyway, because you could cut either of my numbers almost in half by your assumptions. Buy a $10,000 RV or stay at Motel 6. Both will work, and change the computations dramatically.

So I contend that the bottom line is to match your method to your madness.

If I知 right, then what we could discuss is what we do that makes our preferred approch work for us. I would like to hear about a night or two from the big RV group. What is it like? For example, I have friends who have a big one like Kevins or Jacks, who pull a PT Cruiser, and like to stay at hot springs. That sounds sweet to me. We have other friends who pull a 5th wheeler. He puts on a magic show for the neighbors and he always draws a crowd. What a way to make friends!

Any replies?

Keep the Show on the Road!

#25 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 22 August 2007 - 08:39 PM

QUOTE (roadmaven @ Aug 22 2007, 04:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Well, I've got something for you that we plan on having *hopefully* within the next 10 years....and you can tow it with a Vette or Monte Carlo.....or even a Corvair! So, you can still drive your classics AND sleep in it!

"It" is here!

Now wouldn't that just be perfect at the campgrounds at Meremec Caverns?


Roadmaven,

I hate to say this, because the teardrop is one of my favorite travel fantasies...but it ain稚 the bed and the cooking space that is the problem with camping. And I'm talking camping, not RVing. It is the john, warm water, sink, and the shower. The teardrop contains what I don稚 need. I need instead a bathroom on wheels, perhaps with space to store the camping gear.

There is my million dollar contribution to the camping industry. Meet the real need. Call it the Loodrop or powderbox. No No No ...the Loodrop Inn.

Keep the Show on the Road!

#26 jack

jack

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:DeKalb, Illinois (on Lincoln Hiway)
  • Interests:Have 30' Class &quot;C&quot; Gulfstream Motorhome. Have to be satisfied with vacation road trips till two kids are out of college. Then my wife and I plan to go Full-Timing. I'll try any highway that's not an Interstate.

Posted 22 August 2007 - 10:03 PM

Well, it's not really Kevin and Jack against the rest, but let me add a couple of items to Kevin's defense:

If you travel only at certain times you can turn your insurance on and off like motorcycle riders do.
When not in use for extended periods insure the RV like property. IF your agent allows.
You can finance for 15 yrs, usually, and, if you live in it at least two weeks a year (which we do easily) the interest can be subtracted on your Federal Income Tax as a second or summer home. Just like your primary home mortgage.

Most full time RV'ers, those that retire and hit the road as a life, choose a domicile state with little or no taxes. Some states, So. Dakota, Texas, and Oregon are a few, actually cater to out of state residents. I know that sounds like a contradiction. Mail forwarding services place themselves in these states to give you an address, then you register your vehicle there. Some states still do not have state income tax and Montana has no sales tax. So choosing a state base, if the homestead is sold and the RV is it, can be worth a great deal of money.

As others have pointed out it's up to what you're looking for, but I might add: it's how you plan to travel too.
If you are just pulling in for the night, because you have a destination in mind, just plug in power, that's it. You have your own water and toilet or can use the facilities at the RV park. A couple of years ago we went to New Brunswick by entering in Michigan and then crossing Canada to New Brunswick. We just stopped nightly and didn't plug anything in but power, till we entered NB and headed for the coast and the Bay of Fundy to see the tides. Then we stayed two or three days in each place totally hooked up. Emptying the tanks is merely a matter of pulling a gate valve, easy.

Oh, and for "Keep the Show....." If you bought an RV you'd never sell it, you'd be too busy planning your next trip. We bought our 30', Class C six years ago to take the kids to Disney World in Orlando because we don't fly. We thought if we resold it as soon as we got back we'd get back most of our money. We've been traveling ever since.

And one PS: if anyone considers trailers or 5th wheels, don't forget it is against the law in most states to ride in them. With an RV my wife asks, "do you want me to make coffee?" Sure! So while I drive she makes coffee and fixes lunch. It sure ain't camping!!

Jack Burke
DeKalb, Illinois

#27 darthfadar

darthfadar

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 26 posts

Posted 22 August 2007 - 10:22 PM

QUOTE (Keep the Show on the Road! @ Aug 22 2007, 05:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I love reading this thread! Everybody is right...for their lifestyle. I can see each image, and could see myself doing it...some of the time.

And then there is the motel, which we now do a lot.

I agree that tenting is pretty rugged for the chorological high achievers. My wife and I tried it about five years ago by borrowing the kids gear. When some jerk pulled into the campground at 2AM, started a camp fire, and sat around talking and drinking, my fantasies about camping were over.



Either we get a house sitter and leave Bo home, or take him with us. We will not stay another night in a motel doggy room. They may add a $25 cleaning fee to your room bill, but it doesn稚 go for cleaning.

So, lets assume that we RV it. I don稚 want an RV for life. I would sell it when we get back. So lets assume I buy one with 25,000 miles on it and put another 12,000 on it in 3 months. Suppose I pay $35,000 for it. That means I will pay $3000 in tax and I will assume $5000 in depreciation and repairs. So I am out $8000 for the vehicle. At 5mpg, gas at $2.75 is going to cost $6600. Overnights at $20 each for 90 days is $1800. Aside from food, that is $12,800

Now lets use the family car and leave bo with the house sitter instead. Let痴 put the motel with tax at $100 a night or $9000 and gasoline is $1100 at my 30mpg. Depreciation on my car will be $1000. So that is $11,100.

I think eating in or out is a wash. Obviously eating in the RV is less expensive, but then there is the cooking and clean up, etc. And if you really want cheap, use the fringe and microwave in the motel room. If you want to add $20 a day to the food budget for eating out over eating in, the comparison is still a wash.

And that surprised me, a lot. Because every other time I have done the numbers, it was cheaper by motel.

But I contend that the issue isn稚 cost anyway, because you could cut either of my numbers almost in half by your assumptions. Buy a $10,000 RV or stay at Motel 6. Both will work, and change the computations dramatically.

So I contend that the bottom line is to match your method to your madness.

If I知 right, then what we could discuss is what we do that makes our preferred approch work for us. I would like to hear about a night or two from the big RV group. What is it like? For example, I have friends who have a big one like Kevins or Jacks, who pull a PT Cruiser, and like to stay at hot springs. That sounds sweet to me. We have other friends who pull a 5th wheeler. He puts on a magic show for the neighbors and he always draws a crowd. What a way to make friends!

Any replies?

Keep the Show on the Road!



Yes, there is 2 sides to this! I think most important, is Bo. A dog, I would think? Try dogfriendly.com. It shows friendly places to dine, dogfriendly places to motel overnight, dogfriendly RV parks & dog activities.

MY wife & I on our quick runs to Oregon do overnight at Quinta Inn. The dogs do get distracted witht he doors of the other rooms & other noises. We do a 'mindset' expect that type of thing will happen & still enjoy the trip.

La Quinta offers a continental breakfast & some will bring their dogs down at that time. This point where conversations can be made. But, most did not travel by car but flew & are in for business. Still small talk can lead to some great dialog.

I do not advocate buying a motorhome for one trip. There is a lot to learn & things do break. If not mechanically inclined, this will become a trip to nowhere fun. However, there are a number of RVers that are more than willing to provide good advice & help if they find out you are new to RVing.

There are 2 websites to check parks (http://www.rvparkreviews.com/) & service (http://rvservicereviews.com/Index.asp).

Be willing to think about keeping & using the RV. Please note,nothing will age an RV more than non use,inside & out.

Kevin

Read Jack Burke's post above for some good ideas.

#28 jack

jack

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 10 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:DeKalb, Illinois (on Lincoln Hiway)
  • Interests:Have 30' Class &quot;C&quot; Gulfstream Motorhome. Have to be satisfied with vacation road trips till two kids are out of college. Then my wife and I plan to go Full-Timing. I'll try any highway that's not an Interstate.

Posted 22 August 2007 - 10:26 PM

Oh, to: "brownwho63"

I'm 64, so I guess I'm a senior, my wife is younger but has MS and so requires extra rest and more comforts than camping. Believe me, try Rv'ing, you'll be a youngster compared to the ages at most of the RV parks you stop at during your travels. I looked at your red 'vette pictured in your profile, it's cool.
You would trailer it with a cover, not tow it four-wheels-down. I also like your dog, hope mine looks like a traveler. Actually he likes to sleep right next to the LP gas "sniffer" and set off the alarm.

Jack Burke
DeKalb, Illinois

#29 Bucfan

Bucfan

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 31 posts

Posted 23 August 2007 - 08:34 AM

You could describe me as an "RV-wannabe."

I've never been camping, never went on vacation in an RV. I have had an opportunity to travel in someone else's RV, but that was just a way to transport a group of people across the state in one vehicle. I do echo Jack's comment about making coffee while on the road. It was nice to be able to sit at the table and play cards, or get up and go to the bathroom without having to stop at a gas station or rest area, so that's definitely one of the benefits of a motorhome (and the exact reason why I would choose motorized over a fifth wheel or camping trailer).

Now, while some of you are cruisin' in corvettes or a restored '57 Chevy, I'm still driving the '93 Chevy Astro Mini-Van I've had for a dozen years. I swore, though, that when I got rid of it, I would be buying a camper van, something that could be driven around town, to and from work or to the grocery store, yet still be capable of serving as an RV. A couple of years ago, after much study and a trip to the annual RV show in Chicago, the girlfriend and I had set our sights on a Roadtrek. The plan was to buy a Roadtrek, keep it for a couple of years and, if we really liked the whole camping/RVing thing, we would then trade up to a Class C. My son was probably 6 at the time and could easily sleep in the captain's chairs that swiveled around to make another bed.

Unfortunately, our financial situation changed and we weren't able to buy one as soon as we'd hoped. And now that my son is older, I think a van is out of the question--it would be fine for Susan and I, but not for all three of us. So, when it happens, I'm sure we'll be buying a Class C.

One final comment, although this has been debated thoroughly already in this thread ... last year we visited Chattanooga, Tennessee and stayed at a hotel on U.S. 41 just about at the foot of Lookout Mountain. When we got to our room and looked out the window there was a brand-new Wal-Mart (a Grand Opening sign was still attached to the side of the building) behind the hotel. In the parking lot sat a large Class C motorhome. Three days later as we packed up our suitcases and headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights." My point here is, if you travel a lot, say a couple of week-long vacations a year and several long weekend or at least overnight trips, I would think those cost numbers would start to favor RV'ing rather than being a wash, especially if you cut costs some of the time like those folks in the RV at Chattanooga.

#30 roadmaven

roadmaven

    Roadie

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 475 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Hoosier State
  • Interests:2-lane highways, vintage campers, Corvairs, camping, greasy diners

Posted 23 August 2007 - 09:37 AM

QUOTE (Bucfan @ Aug 23 2007, 09:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
One final comment, although this has been debated thoroughly already in this thread ... last year we visited Chattanooga, Tennessee and stayed at a hotel on U.S. 41 just about at the foot of Lookout Mountain. When we got to our room and looked out the window there was a brand-new Wal-Mart (a Grand Opening sign was still attached to the side of the building) behind the hotel. In the parking lot sat a large Class C motorhome. Three days later as we packed up our suitcases and headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights." My point here is, if you travel a lot, say a couple of week-long vacations a year and several long weekend or at least overnight trips, I would think those cost numbers would start to favor RV'ing rather than being a wash, especially if you cut costs some of the time like those folks in the RV at Chattanooga.


I've heard somewhere that most Wal*Marts have an RV-friendly policy of some sort of letting RVers park overnight in their parking lots. One site I read said about 9 out of 10 stores have this policy.

#31 darthfadar

darthfadar

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 26 posts

Posted 23 August 2007 - 11:46 AM

QUOTE (Bucfan @ Aug 23 2007, 06:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You could describe me as an "RV-wannabe."

headed out for another leg of our trip the Class C was still sitting in the Wal-Mart lot. As I got to the car with our bill in hand, I looked at Susan and said "We just paid more than $300 for three nights in this hotel (which was a decent hotel ... Baymont, I believe). Those people over in the Wal-Mart lot haven't paid a cent for the last three nights.


Most Walmarts welcome overnight parking & not RVing. his has become a problem for some cities & Walmarts that usually ends up creating a no overnight parking ban.

Unless there is a mechanical issue, one night should be the limit. No BBQs or lawn chairs out or awnings pulled out.

Walmart is great for pulling in late in the afternoon & being gone before the buisness day rush & leaving the area where parked, better than I found it.

However, there is nothing to stop one from moving their RV to another business lot with their approval. In fact, we've stayed in a church parking lot mid week w/o an issue when campgrounds were not available.

One other note. The Route 66 Casino in New Mexico is good for parking. And, does allow a view of the Rio Puerco Bridge.

Kevin

Edited by Kevin, 23 August 2007 - 11:48 AM.


#32 Davydd

Davydd

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Touring, camping, kayaking, boating and pursuing breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches

Posted 06 December 2007 - 06:41 PM

I just found this forum through the demise of a diner thanks to Roadmaven.

I have a Class B motorhome or B Van, or Camper Van, or touring coach or whatever you may want to call it. I love it. I can drive it anywhere and in fact I prefer the blue highways over the freeways. I can also park it almost anywhere since it will fit in most parking spots. It has a two-burner gas range, microwave, refrigerator, sink, built-in coffeemaker, bathroom with vanity, flat screen TV/DVD, electric sofa that turns down into a queen size bed, air-conditioning, gas furnace, hotwater tank, and generator all in the same footprint of a crew cab long bed pickup truck. The engine is a 5 cylinder Mercedes Benz diesel and gets a true 22 mpg and a high of around 24 mpg when traveling the blue highways at 55 mph. That is my preference. It seems plenty big for two of us and pure luxury compared to 40 years of tent camping.

This past season from April to October we put on over 14,000 miles out 50 nights. Only 24 of those nights were spent in campgrounds. We stayed with friends and relatives a lot around the country and even a few nights in motels. We enjoy the flexibility in that regard.

My quests take me to the north woods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan a lot. I also travel to my hometown for the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 races every year in Speedway, IN. This coming year we will rally with over 50 other B vanners in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio and Niobrara State Park in Nebraska. We hope to strike out this late winter or early spring for New Mexico and Arizona. Maybe the following year we will head to Alaska. If not we are definitely heading to the Rockies and will be able to travel the Going to the Sun road in Glacier National Park.

What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.

#33 Chris Rowland

Chris Rowland

    Roadie

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Withamsville, OH
  • Interests:Cartography, Reuben sandwiches, manual typewriters

Posted 06 December 2007 - 07:02 PM

QUOTE (Davydd @ Dec 6 2007, 06:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.

I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

Chris

#34 Davydd

Davydd

    Day Tripper

  • Full Members
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Touring, camping, kayaking, boating and pursuing breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches

Posted 06 December 2007 - 07:10 PM

QUOTE (Chris Rowland @ Dec 6 2007, 06:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

Chris

Chris,

I've been to your site. I think it is great.

#35 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 06 December 2007 - 08:29 PM

QUOTE (Chris Rowland @ Dec 6 2007, 04:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I guess I'm on somewhat of a similar track. I actually am on a quest to review Reuben sandwiches and do so on my Reuben Realm web site. I've got 110 Reuben reviews posted so far. Next week, WFYI is scheduled to tape me for a segment on their Across Indiana television program.

Chris

Chris,

WOW! You are the man when it comes to reubens! Love em, but never rated them. Do you have rating criteria, or is it up to the individual and sort of subjective?

I can see there is a need for a western rater! I might be your man laugh.gif !

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

#36 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 06 December 2007 - 08:40 PM

QUOTE (Davydd @ Dec 6 2007, 03:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I just found this forum through the demise of a diner thanks to Roadmaven.

I have a Class B motorhome or B Van, or Camper Van, or touring coach or whatever you may want to call it. I love it. I can drive it anywhere and in fact I prefer the blue highways over the freeways. I can also park it almost anywhere since it will fit in most parking spots. It has a two-burner gas range, microwave, refrigerator, sink, built-in coffeemaker, bathroom with vanity, flat screen TV/DVD, electric sofa that turns down into a queen size bed, air-conditioning, gas furnace, hotwater tank, and generator all in the same footprint of a crew cab long bed pickup truck. The engine is a 5 cylinder Mercedes Benz diesel and gets a true 22 mpg and a high of around 24 mpg when traveling the blue highways at 55 mph. That is my preference. It seems plenty big for two of us and pure luxury compared to 40 years of tent camping.

This past season from April to October we put on over 14,000 miles out 50 nights. Only 24 of those nights were spent in campgrounds. We stayed with friends and relatives a lot around the country and even a few nights in motels. We enjoy the flexibility in that regard.

My quests take me to the north woods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan a lot. I also travel to my hometown for the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 races every year in Speedway, IN. This coming year we will rally with over 50 other B vanners in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio and Niobrara State Park in Nebraska. We hope to strike out this late winter or early spring for New Mexico and Arizona. Maybe the following year we will head to Alaska. If not we are definitely heading to the Rockies and will be able to travel the Going to the Sun road in Glacier National Park.

What I do a lot of is pursue breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches. I've sampled over 80 in diners and restaurants in Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Virginia and Texas over the past two years.

It is a great way to hit the American road as far as I am concerned.


Davydd,

I'm glad to see someone praise the Class B van. I think they are perfect in most ways. We owned one for several years. I took mine on rutted mountain roads and expressways, just about anywhere I would have been able to go in the family sedan. Easy to drive, park anywhere, sleep in comfort, quick to get back on the road, etc. Great choice!

Everything was perfect except one thing, and it finally was its demise...my wife "needs her space." We honestly thought about towing a trailer....but come on. Even now, I look at one on the road like I used to look at red sports cars.

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

#37 Chris Rowland

Chris Rowland

    Roadie

  • Full Members
  • PipPip
  • 258 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Withamsville, OH
  • Interests:Cartography, Reuben sandwiches, manual typewriters

Posted 06 December 2007 - 09:02 PM

QUOTE (Keep the Show on the Road! @ Dec 6 2007, 08:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
WOW! You are the man when it comes to reubens! Love em, but never rated them. Do you have rating criteria, or is it up to the individual and sort of subjective?

I can see there is a need for a western rater! I might be your man laugh.gif !

Keep the Show on the Road! Dave

Just download one of my "Reubens on the Road" review forms (Review Forms and fill it out. It's mostly subjective. I usually measure them and photograph them to get some stats, but when it comes to the letter grades for different categories, it's just up to the individual.

I've had individuals and small groups get together and send in some reviews before. Just take some photos (one of the exterior of the restaurant, one of the Reuben and one of the dining area/diners if possible) and send in the rating form!

Chris

#38 mobilene

mobilene

    Road Scholar

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Indianapolis

Posted 07 December 2007 - 06:47 AM

I'm imagining a deluge of reviews from the Northwest....

#39 DennyG

DennyG

    Road Scholar

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cincinnati, OH

Posted 07 December 2007 - 09:36 AM

QUOTE (mobilene @ Dec 7 2007, 06:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm imagining a deluge of reviews from the Northwest....
Perhaps with video of the actual devouring. laugh.gif

#40 Keep the Show on the Road!

Keep the Show on the Road!

    King of the Road

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,638 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puget Sound

Posted 07 December 2007 - 10:41 AM

Finally, something I am truly qualified to do! And I have a passion for the work. Does it get any better?!

I知 thinking maybe I should 努arm up, so to speak ,before I do any reviews...kind of a trial run..a pilot test...

Video...that痴 good...but better yet...stop frame...Will I need a GPS?

It痴 7:30 AM. Is it wrong to ask for a Reuben for breakfast?

Keep theShow on the Road! Dave




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users